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Once Students Have Completed the Midterm Survey

Viewing the Survey Results

    1. Go to the UO Canvas login page (https://canvas.uoregon.edu/).

    2. Log in to Canvas using the first part of your UO email address for the Username(ex: tstark2) and the Password for your email account. Click on the Login button.

    3. In the Canvas User Dashboard screen locate the dropdown option entitled Courses and click on the name of the course you want to develop the survey for.

    4. Locate the Quizzes option in the main navigation menu bar (left side).

    5. Click on the Midterm Assessment of Teaching link to open the Survey.

    6. To access individual (but anonymous, if you have set the Survey up to be anonymous, which is recommended) responses to the Survey:
      • Click on the gear icon button in the upper right part of the screen.
      • From the dropdown options choose Show Student Results. (Note: Canvas will also show you how many students have submitted the Survey here.)
      • On this screen you will see two columns, one for the students who have completed the Survey and those who have not. If you click on the linked name of the student you will see the answers to your Survey questions. Note: The anonymous feature in Canvas sets up the students as generic "Student 1," "Student 2," and so on.
    7. To access all of the Survey responses at once:
      • Locate under the Related Items column to the right.
      • Click on Survey Statistics.
      • Now click on Student analysis and a csv file will be downloaded for you to open and review.

Share the Results with the Class

It is important that you follow-up on the feedback with your class. Studies show that students have little confidence that end-of-the-term evaluations affect teaching behaviors. Similarly, your students will be skeptical of the value of survey if you never mention it again.

By sharing the results with your class as soon as possible, you will: